• 3 Strategies to Improve Patient Access

    By Kindred Hospital Rehabilitation Services
    Today’s healthcare environment is changing rapidly, resulting in increasing challenges for providers running acute rehabilitation programs. One of the most common obstacles is patient access. Read Full Post
  • The Importance of CARF Accreditation

    By Kindred Hospital Rehabilitation Services
    Being accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) can help your program stand out. CARF accreditation ensures physicians are providing patients with care that meets internationally accepted standards; reinforces person-focused standards that emphasize an integrated and individualized approach to services and outcomes; establishes accountability to funding sources, referral agencies, and the community of a commitment to quality; and provides guidance for responsible management and professional growth of personnel. Read Full Post
  • 5 Strategies for Reducing Reimbursement Disputes

    By Kindred Hospital Rehabilitation Services
    The world of healthcare is becoming increasingly complex. Consequently, providers running inpatient rehabilitation programs are confronted with growing challenges – including the issue of reimbursement. Read Full Post
  • CMS Proposed Rule: Key Concerns

    By Kindred Hospital Rehabilitation Services
    Kindred recently commented on Medicare’s 2020 proposed rule for freestanding and hospital-based inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs). The response was consistent with Kindred’s mission to help patients reach their highest potential for health and healing with intensive medical and rehabilitative care through a compassionate patient experience. Read Full Post
  • Certificate of Need (CON) is a public policy tool which seeks to slow healthcare cost growth, avoid duplication of programs and services and ensure that new development meets the needs of the community. Nationally, only 12 states have no CON requirements. In Florida, the CON program was enacted in 1973 and applied to the building of new health centers or expansion of certain, complex medical services – including hospitals, nursing facilities, hospices and intermediate care facilities for the developmentally disabled. Read Full Post
  • What Consumers Want — Understanding Post-Acute Patients and Families

    By Kindred Hospital Rehabilitation Services
    Healthcare has undergone rapid consumerization over the past decade. This transformation has impacted what patients expect from their post-acute care provider. Selecting the appropriate level of care to meet their unique needs is critical for their long term recovery. But how does the patient and their family choose the right setting for this level of care? Read Full Post
  • CMS Proposed Payment Rule for IRFs in 2020: Key Information for IRF-level Care

    By Kindred Hospital Rehabilitation Services
    On April 17, CMS issued a proposed rule for the Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility (IRF) prospective payment system (PPS) for fiscal year 2020. The proposed rule includes notable changes. Read Full Post
  • Ask These Questions to Help Identify the Right Rehab Partner

    By Kindred Hospital Rehabilitation Services
    Many healthcare providers are seeking support from dedicated rehabilitation partners. Receiving support from a third-party team of rehab experts enables healthcare providers to reach the highest levels of performance in this niche and highly-regulated space. The right partner can help you boost program performance and scale. When evaluating the quality of a potential partner, it is critical to ask 9 key questions. Read Full Post
  • In early March, KRS leadership – including its medical advisory board – went to Washington to advocate for inpatient rehabilitation. Read Full Post
  • Rock Health Study Shows Consumers Increasingly Using Digital Tech for Health Conditions

    By Kindred Hospital Rehabilitation Services
    Rock Health’s fourth national consumer survey on digital health adoption and sentiments in 2018 included more than 4,000 U.S. adults and found that 89% of respondents used at least one digital health tool, up from 80% in 2015. Moreover, respondents reported using wearable technology – for example, the Apple Watch – to perform tasks that are health condition-related at a faster rate than fitness-related. Read Full Post