Utilizing Technology To Improve Patient Motivation

By Kindred Hospital Rehabilitation Services

Utilizing Technology To Improve Patient Motivation

Rehabilitation professionals have long understood patient engagement and motivation are strong predictors for whether or not the patient will have optimal clinical outcomes and improvement. However, it is difficult to define the concept of patient motivation.1 One analysis indicates that motivation is caused by a patient’s own personality, but affected by clinical factors, family factors, cultural factors, the rehabilitation environment, and the rehab professional’s behavior.2

Fortunately, therapists point to specific strategies to improve motivation and engage patients in their goals, including:

  1. Working with the patient to set relevant goals that are understandable and achievable,
  2. Providing information about rehabilitation such as their progress toward recovery,
  3. An understanding of how the patient could fare with no rehabilitation gains,
  4. The rationale behind why certain exercises had to be performed.3

The time is now to integrate technology into patient care and hone those efforts for maximum success, according to peer-reviewed research published in the journal JMIR Research Protocols.4

Additionally, it is imperative that strategies account for cultural norms and family dynamics to meet patients and their support networks at all levels. Enter: new technology.

There is significant opportunity for healthcare providers to put new tools into the hands of patients through their own smart-phones to improve motivation in achieving their rehabilitation goals. This is based on analysis that supported the fact that inpatient rehabilitation patients preferred to rely on the continued use of mainstream devices, such as cell phones, when they were discussing opportunities for using technology to increase therapeutic engagement.5 Patient interviews supported the use of reliable and intuitive technologies that feature opportunities for practice outside of therapy, goals for rehabilitative exercises, ongoing motivation and social interactions.6 To read more about technology solutions that can drive business results, click here to read our White Paper on this topic.


References

  1. Maclean, N., Pound, P., Wolfe, C., & Rudd, A. (2000). A critical review of the concept of patient motivation in the literature on physical rehabilitation. Soc Sci Med, 50(4), 495-506.
  2. Maclean, N., Pound, P., Wolfe, C., & Rudd, A. (2002). The concept of patient motivation: a qualitative analysis of stroke professionals’ attitudes. Stroke, 33(2), 444-448.
  3. Maclean, N., Pound, P., Wolfe, C., & Rudd, A. (2002). The concept of patient motivation: a qualitative analysis of stroke professionals’ attitudes. Stroke, 33(2), 444-448.
  4. McAlearney AS, Sieck CJ, Hefner JL, Aldrich AM, Walker DM, Rizer MK, Moffatt-Bruce SD, Huerta TR. High Touch and High Tech (HT2) Proposal: Transforming Patient Engagement Throughout the Continuum of Care by Engaging Patients with Portal Technology at the Bedside. JMIR Res Protoc. 2016 Nov 29;5(4):e221.
  5. Fager, S. K., & Burnfi eld, J. M. (2014). Patients’ experiences with technology during inpatient rehabilitation: opportunities to support independence and therapeutic engagement. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 9(2), 121-127.
  6. Fager, S. K., & Burnfi eld, J. M. (2014). Patients’ experiences with technology during inpatient rehabilitation: opportunities to support independence and therapeutic engagement. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 9(2), 121-127.
By Kindred Hospital Rehabilitation Services