Staff Development Coordinators (SDCs) take on numerous jobs within their facilities, which can be difficult to balance. Marailey Poindujour, SDC at Kindred Transitional Care and Rehabilitation – Avery, is in charge of employee education, employee immunizations, keeping track of license certifications, infection control, and new hire orientation. Marailey also serves as co-chair to her facility’s safety committee and as a clinical educator, dealing with complex patient issues.

“If we have a patient come in with complex issues, it’s my job to learn about those issues,” she said. “Recently, we had a patient come in with a life vest. I had never worked with one before, so I had to learn about it and educate the employees.”

Poindujour has been SDC for three years, but has worked at Kindred Transitional Care and Rehabilitation – Avery for five. For the first two years, she was the facility’s short term unit manager. She loves educating, so the transition from short term unit manager to SDC wasn’t that big of a leap. In fact, teaching is Marailey’s favorite part of her job. She also likes having the authority to change an issue whenever one occurs. The hardest part of her job is keeping everything together, especially since her job requires her to fulfill so many different responsibilities.

“SDCs are the foundation for all the systems in the facility,” said Marailey. “If you have no organization, then things can fall apart.”

Ruby Borja is an SDC at Kindred Hospital Las Vegas – Flamingo Subacute Unit. She takes on multiple responsibilities, as well.

“Being a Staff Development Coordinator requires me to wear three different hats. I’m responsible for maintaining employee files and health, infection control for employees and patients, and educating employees,” said Borja.

Ruby has been working at the hospital for three years, but started off as a floor nurse. Borja was eventually offered the job of unit manager, just like Poindujour, and she applied for the SDC position from there. Borja has been the SDC at Flamingo since last October.

Borja loves her job because she loves teaching and working with people. On the other hand, she agrees with Poindujour that the hardest task associated with being an SDC is organization.

“The hardest part of being an SDC is making sure everyone is trained and keeping track of everything,” she said. “It’s doable, but that part is the hardest.”

Special thanks to these SDCs and all others for their hard work in our facilities!