• Healthcare Headlines - November 2016 in Review

    By Kindred Healthcare

    HCH Monthly

    ICD-10 One Year Later: The Terror is Over, the Rewards Yet to Materialize

    It's been a year since the big lift of converting the entire claim stream for the healthcare industry to the larger and more granular ICD-10 family of diagnostic and procedural codes. Read More   

    Hospitals Add Nearly 7,000 Jobs in September

    Employment at the nation's hospitals rose by 0.1% in September to a seasonally adjusted 5,110,200 people, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Read More  

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  • There's a Code for That! - ICD-10 Thanksgiving Edition

    By Maggie Cunningham

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    For some, Thanksgiving is about family and giving thanks, for others it is about football or shopping. Regardless of what or why you are celebrating, there are plenty of accidents that land people in the emergency rooms, from deep-fried chicken incidents to Black Friday stampedes.

    Luckily, in 2015, the most recent revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) was released by the World Health Organization (WHO). The updated lists holds more than 14,000 codes, and 16,000 with optional sub-classifications of diseases, symptoms, complaints and external causes of injury or disease.

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  • Kindred's Commitment to Physicians

    By Maggie Cunningham
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    To continue our efforts of constantly improving our patients' care and outcomes, we are investing in new ways to support our physicians - a Pillar of Clinical Excellence here at Kindred. Kindred's Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Marc Rothman, addressed our company-wide commitment to our physicians in a recent video.  

    As noted, our world and the healthcare landscape are constantly changing, so we must adapt with it, ensuring our physicians have the tools and resources they need to be successful.

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  • 2016 Clinical Impact Symposium Wrap-Up

    By Kindred Healthcare

    audience 20The eighth annual Kindred Clinical Impact Symposium has officially come to a close. Luckily, we live-blogged the whole event, so you can always find that content right here on the Kindred Continuum. Here's a look at each of the speakers and panels in order: 

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  • pearlinastorm61
    If you're in the room with Tori Murden McClure it's hard not to feel like an underachiever. Currently the President of Spalding University in Louisville, she has worked for the Mayor of Louisville and Muhammad Ali. She graduated from Smith, has a master's degree in divinity from Harvard, a law degree from the University of Louisville, and an MFA from Spalding.

    Along the way, she's climbed mountains, traveled to the South Pole, and rowed alone across the Atlantic. She didn't need to tell us her story about her ocean voyage. Instead, she shared a TED Talk video with singer/songwriter Dawn Landis, who turned McClure's story into a song. Landis called it "A song for my hero, the woman who rowed into a hurricane."

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  • A Focus on Palliative Care - Clinical Impact Symposium 2016

    By Maggie Cunningham

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    As you may already know, palliative care is the management of physical, emotional, social and spiritual suffering. It also involves directed treatments related to chronic, life-threatening or terminal pain and disease. Most important, palliative care means improving the quality of care through communication and informed decision making. It is a HOLISTIC approach.

    Palliative care is NOT a single treatment algorithm and not limited to end-of-life care or restricted to pain management, nor is it only appropriate for cancer-related diagnoses.

    "It has been the biggest battle with healthcare providers to separate the differences between hospice and palliative care," explained Dr. Riar. He then clarified that hospice is an insurance-provided service and palliative is a way of improving quality of life.

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  • vet flag 1
    As part of Kindred's celebration honoring veterans in our country, Divisional Vice President Selece Beasley paid tribute to the men and women who have served over the years, including both her father and grandfather.

    The service and sacrifice of these veterans, she noted, is humbling. She is proud that Kindred is able to help care for veterans and proud of the employees who provide that care. She shared the story of Julius Lenhbeuter, a World War II veteran and Kindred hospice patient in St. Louis.

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  • Returning to the WHY - Clinical Symposium Impact 2016

    By Maggie Cunningham

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    Glenda Mack, Divisional Vice President of Clinical Operations for Kindred Hospital Rehabilitative Services, introduced Christa Dempsey, Chief Nursing Officer of Press Ganey.

    Dempsey began by asking the audience to remember why they began working in the medical field. "We didn't get into this business for the money or the hours," said Dempsey. "We need to get back to WHY we all got into this business in the beginning."

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  • "We've talked about pain, pain management and how pain is treated. Now we turn toward our relationships and interactions with patients," said Dr. Marc Rothman, Kindred's Chief Medical Officer, in his introduction to the next presentation during the 2016 Clinical Impact Symposium.

    Rothman then introduced Dr. VJ (Vicente) Velez - MD, FACP, FHM, Internal Medicine Hospitalist at the Cleveland Clinic and Institute Experience Officer for the Department of Medicine Institute.


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  • Dr. Ed Covington is the former director of the Cleveland Clinic Chronic Pain Rehabilitation Program and his career has largely centered on understanding and treating pain. He is quick to note that there is no "one right way" to treat pain, but emphasizes that "success comes only from addressing the whole person."

    At the beginning of his presentation, he asked one question: "Why talk about pain?" It turns out the simple answer is because it needs to be talked about. We don't know enough and some of what we believe, or have been taught, is simply wrong. 

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