• Embedding Clinical Systems Across the Continuum

    By Kindred Healthcare
    CIS Scott Blanchette Nov 12 aScott Blanchette, the Chief Information Officer for Kindred Healthcare, addressed three main areas related to change – why we should do it, how to do it, and what will happen next. Looking at the “why,” Blanchette points to the current financial state of the United States, examining the country’s bottom line. While income is up, expenses have nearly doubled. In fact, Blanchette notes that the U.S. is gathering debt faster than any other time in history except during World War I and World War II. And the biggest costs are tied to healthcare and an aging population, with nearly half of the money being spent on Social Security (24%), Medicare (14%) and Medicaid (9%). That may be enough of a reason to embrace change, but Blanchette points to an eye-opening projection: By 2026, Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security will be the entirety of the government’s budget.

     

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  • CIS - Pam Duncan Nov12 aWhen it comes to improving the American healthcare system to provide higher quality care at lower cost, we must be mindful of how we are currently failing the patient, and how to remedy that, not place all of our focus on system failure. By improving the care given to the patient, improvement in the system will follow. So says Pam Duncan, PhD, PT, FAPTA, FAHA, Wake Forest Baptist Health, who addressed the group of attendees this morning at the 2014 Kindred Clinical Impact Symposium: Clinical Excellence in the Care of the Stroke Patient Across the Continuum.

     

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  • Enhancing Patient and Provider Experience with Every Single WorldAdrienne Boissy, MD, MA, is the Medical Director for the Center of Excellence in Healthcare Communication at the Cleveland Clinic. She and her team have created a comprehensive program to strengthen physician and provider communication skills throughout the Cleveland Clinic and have trained more than 4,000 staff physicians and house staff to date.

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  • Mary's Care Transition Story

    By Kindred Healthcare
    NOTE: Mary's story is purely hypothetical and was crafted specifically for 2014 Clinical Impact Symposium attendees to use as an exercise in care transitions. Any resemblance to a person living or deceased is coincidental.

    Last year, at the Kindred Clinical Impact Symposium, participants followed the fictional story of patient Jack Marton, who suffered an accident and then faced a complicated recovery through several levels of post-acute care. This year, attendees will consider the case of Jack’s fictional wife, Mary, who serves as Jack’s primary caregiver. Mary and Jack’s children live in Utah and Pennsylvania, so Mary does it all – cooking, cleaning, running errands and taking care of Jack, including taking him to his doctor appointments, since home health has signed off the case. Read Full Post
  • Transitional Care of the CVA Patient and Family Experience

    By Kindred Healthcare
    Transitional Care of the CVA Patient/Family ExperienceWe all know that family caregivers play a critical role in maintaining the gains patients make in post-acute recovery, especially after they transition to home. But truly understanding the complexity of the family caregiver role is crucial to ensuring that patients are in good hands, have the best chance at maintaining their gains and avoid returning to a higher level of care, all of which affect post-acute outcomes.

    Eric Coleman, MD, MPH, AGSF, FACP, Director, University of Colorado Denver, has been a favorite speaker at Kindred’s Clinical Impact Symposium, and this year he returned to explore the family experience in the transitional care of the CVA patient.

     

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  • Stroke: The Patient Experience

    By Kindred Healthcare
    Stroke: The Patient ExperienceJill Bolte Taylor, Ph.D., is a Harvard-trained and published neuroanatomist. Her research specialty was in the postmortem investigation of the human brain as it relates to schizophrenia and severe mental illnesses. She is also an artist, author, and stroke survivor.

    In 1996, Dr. Taylor experienced a severe hemorrhage in the left hemisphere of her brain that left her unable to speak, move, or remember her life from before. Her book on her experience, “My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist’s Personal Journey,” was a New York Times bestseller. Although it took her eight years to recover her physical function and thinking ability, she is quick to note that she is still regaining abilities she had prior to her stroke. Read Full Post
  • Diaz Honored with Caring Award

    By Kindred Healthcare
    Diaz Honored with Caring AwardPaul Diaz, Chief Executive Officer of Kindred Healthcare, was named recipient of the first Kindred Caring Award, an honor that will be known as the Paul Diaz Caring Award going forward. The announcement was made at the 2014 Kindred Clinical Impact Symposium, being held this week in Louisville.

    Diaz was honored for the investment he has made over the past 12 years in the entire company – patients and employees alike. Read Full Post
  • Leadership Vision

    By Kindred Healthcare

    Leadership VisionPaul Diaz, Kindred’s Chief Executive Officer, and Benjamin Breier, its President and Chief Operating Officer, delivered a summary of leadership’s vision for the future of the company this morning at the 2014 Kindred Clinical Impact Symposium.

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  • Divisional Leadership Kicks off Clinical Impact Symposium

    By Kindred Healthcare
    Divisional Leadership Kicks off Clinical Impact SymposiumThe 2014 Kindred Clinical Impact Symposium: Clinical Excellence in the Care of the Stroke Patient Across the Continuum began this morning with welcoming remarks from Kindred’s leadership team.

    Anthony Disser, Senior Vice President of Clinical Operations, kicked things off by reminding participants of the significance of the word “impact,” and the importance of taking lessons from the symposium back home to their facilities and their communities.

    After a tribute to veterans on this Veterans Day, given by Mary van de Kamp, Senior Vice President of Quality and Care Management, Mike Beal, President of the Nursing Center Division, asked attendees to think not about the “what” of the care we deliver each day, but the “how.”

     

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