• Kindred Named Most Admired Healthcare Company for Eighth Year

    By Maggie Cunningham
    kindred nurses
    For the eighth time, Kindred Healthcare has been named by Fortune as one of the World's Most Admired Healthcare Companies. Each year, Fortune partners with Korn Ferry Hay group, a global organizational advisory group.

     

    Together they survey top industry minds and leaders, including executives, directors and securities analysts. These industry elites span 680 of the world's highest-revenue companies in 28 countries and across more than 51 industries. Additionally, each company's score must be in the top 50% of the industry survey in order to be listed.

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  • Healthcare Headlines -September 2016 in Review

    By Kindred Healthcare

    HCH Monthly

    Hospice Care Improves Patient Experience

    A new study adds to evidence that hospice care during the last six months of life is associated with better overall experiences for patients and a lower likelihood of dying in a hospital. Read More   

    Study Finds Benefits When Seniors Call Shots to Help Them

    A federally funded project that researchers say has potential to promote aging in place began by asking low-income seniors with disabilities how their lives at home could be better, according to a study released Wednesday. Read More  

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  • Pure Oxygen, Amazing Results: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for WoundsHyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a process in which a patient breathes 100 percent oxygen at above-normal atmospheric pressure. The process increases the delivery of oxygen to the body, enhancing the body’s natural healing process.

    The Hyperbaric Manager at Kindred Hospital Kansas City has seen the positive effects of HBOT on persistent wounds firsthand.

    "For those who have tried other therapies with no results, they can find great benefits with hyperbaric oxygen wound therapy," she says. It can be "life-changing," she adds, when a patient no longer has to deal with a wound that wouldn't heal and was impacting his daily life. Read Full Post
  • What Can we do About Burnout Among Palliative Care Doctors?

    By Dianne Halderman, AVP, Clinical Operations, Kindred at Home

    Results of a recent study showed that burnout among palliative care physicians – those who focus on pain and symptom relief among patients with various diseases and conditions – is extraordinarily high: over 62 percent. The study, which relied on a survey of over 1,200 hospice and palliative care clinicians, also found that 50 percent of palliative care physicians expect to leave the field in the next 10 years. Severity of the burnout seemed to be affected by younger age, having fewer colleagues and working weekends.

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  • Terah Hatter can sum up her job in one word – amazing. Her job, she says, “is about caring.”

    “It’s an honor to walk beside the patient and family to help them through a difficult time,” says Hatter, LMSW, a social worker for, which is an affiliate of Kindred at Home and an agency that provides home health, hospice and private duty nursing care in Texas.

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  • Helping Patients Move Forward After Brain Injury

    By Kindred Healthcare

    Helping Patients Move Forward After Brain InjuryAn individualized care plan is critical when helping brain injury patients recover and return home. And it takes a team of specialists to tailor the rehabilitation plan so it addresses both the physical, cognitive, and emotional issues involved.

    The brain injury program at Kindred’s Inpatient Rehabilitation Hospitals focuses on helping patients restore function and learn how to do things differently when functions can’t be restored to pre-injury levels. The program combines a multidisciplinary team with the technologies and tools specifically geared toward brain injuries.

    In addition to physician specialists, Kindred’s brain injury team includes rehabilitation trained nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, clinical dietitians, neuropsychologists, orthotists, social workers and case managers. The therapists often have extensive training in areas such as Neuro-IFRAH, Neurodevelopmental technique, Vital Stim, and more.

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  • Insight Into Aortic Valve Disease: A Personal Journey

    By Kindred Healthcare

    You wouldn’t know it to look at her, but Sally Meilun who has worked at Kindred Healthcare for nearly 23 years, has heart disease.

    When you talk to Sally, it’s clear that a healthy lifestyle is important to her. She’s always been active, and she still is, but when she was in her 40s, she was diagnosed with aortic valve disease, a condition in which the valve between the left ventricle and the aorta doesn’t work properly.

    “When you have heart disease, it’s not always obvious,” says Sally, who works as the Director of Travel and Relocation at Kindred’s Support Center in Louisville, Kentucky.

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  • What are Pressure Ulcers and Why are They a Problem?

    By Kindred Healthcare

    Have you ever heard the term “bed sore” before? “Bed sore” is another way of saying “pressure ulcer,” a condition that occurs when pressure, with or without friction, builds up in an area of the body, such as the sacrum, coccyx, heels or hips, particularly in an immobile person. Pressure obstructs blood flow to the soft tissue, causing injury to the area. Because pressure ulcers can develop in patients confined to wheelchairs or beds in a hospital or long-term care facility, caregivers must be well trained in preventing pressure ulcers and treating them early and effectively when they do develop. The more advanced a pressure ulcer gets, the harder it is to treat and the longer it may take to heal.

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  • Kim Warchol has been an Occupational Therapist specializing in dementia for more than 24 years. One minute of listening to her talk about her field and you can hear the years of experience and passion in every word. But she readily admits that she wasn’t prepared to deal with cognitive impairment when she first started practicing.

    Her “aha!” moment came through the work of Claudia Kay Allen, MA, OTR/L, FAOTA, which completely changed her perspective from focusing on the limitations of patients with cognitive impairment to focusing on uncovering what they could do. She hasn’t looked back since and, she says, she is no longer “leaving these vulnerable individuals to fend for themselves.”

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  •  Stacey Seggelke, MS, RN, CNS, CDE, BC-ADM Stacey Seggelke, MS, RN, CNS, CDE, BC-ADM

    Stacey Seggelke, sees patients with diabetes both in and out of the hospital, and shared her experiences at the Kindred Clinical Impact Symposium. She is a member of the inpatient Glucose Management team at the University of Colorado Hospital and has an outpatient diabetes clinic one day per week.

    There has been a steady and significant increase in diabetes over the last 30 years. It affects 8 percent of the population, and it is estimated that there are 79 million people who are pre-diabetic. Even when it is not the primary diagnosis, diabetes impacts the care provided to the person, and Seggelke works with her patients from admission to discharge to make sure that the treatments for other medical issues don’t harm the patient or cause problems related to their diabetes.

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