• CIS - Pam Duncan Nov12 aWhen it comes to improving the American healthcare system to provide higher quality care at lower cost, we must be mindful of how we are currently failing the patient, and how to remedy that, not place all of our focus on system failure. By improving the care given to the patient, improvement in the system will follow. So says Pam Duncan, PhD, PT, FAPTA, FAHA, Wake Forest Baptist Health, who addressed the group of attendees this morning at the 2014 Kindred Clinical Impact Symposium: Clinical Excellence in the Care of the Stroke Patient Across the Continuum.

     

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  • Enhancing Patient and Provider Experience with Every Single WorldAdrienne Boissy, MD, MA, is the Medical Director for the Center of Excellence in Healthcare Communication at the Cleveland Clinic. She and her team have created a comprehensive program to strengthen physician and provider communication skills throughout the Cleveland Clinic and have trained more than 4,000 staff physicians and house staff to date.

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  • Mary's Care Transition Story

    By Kindred Healthcare
    NOTE: Mary's story is purely hypothetical and was crafted specifically for 2014 Clinical Impact Symposium attendees to use as an exercise in care transitions. Any resemblance to a person living or deceased is coincidental.

    Last year, at the Kindred Clinical Impact Symposium, participants followed the fictional story of patient Jack Marton, who suffered an accident and then faced a complicated recovery through several levels of post-acute care. This year, attendees will consider the case of Jack’s fictional wife, Mary, who serves as Jack’s primary caregiver. Mary and Jack’s children live in Utah and Pennsylvania, so Mary does it all – cooking, cleaning, running errands and taking care of Jack, including taking him to his doctor appointments, since home health has signed off the case. Read Full Post
  • Transitional Care of the CVA Patient and Family Experience

    By Kindred Healthcare
    Transitional Care of the CVA Patient/Family ExperienceWe all know that family caregivers play a critical role in maintaining the gains patients make in post-acute recovery, especially after they transition to home. But truly understanding the complexity of the family caregiver role is crucial to ensuring that patients are in good hands, have the best chance at maintaining their gains and avoid returning to a higher level of care, all of which affect post-acute outcomes.

    Eric Coleman, MD, MPH, AGSF, FACP, Director, University of Colorado Denver, has been a favorite speaker at Kindred’s Clinical Impact Symposium, and this year he returned to explore the family experience in the transitional care of the CVA patient.

     

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  • Stroke: The Patient Experience

    By Kindred Healthcare
    Stroke: The Patient ExperienceJill Bolte Taylor, Ph.D., is a Harvard-trained and published neuroanatomist. Her research specialty was in the postmortem investigation of the human brain as it relates to schizophrenia and severe mental illnesses. She is also an artist, author, and stroke survivor.

    In 1996, Dr. Taylor experienced a severe hemorrhage in the left hemisphere of her brain that left her unable to speak, move, or remember her life from before. Her book on her experience, “My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist’s Personal Journey,” was a New York Times bestseller. Although it took her eight years to recover her physical function and thinking ability, she is quick to note that she is still regaining abilities she had prior to her stroke. Read Full Post
  • Helping You Breathe Easier

    By Kindred Healthcare
    Helping You Breathe EasierKindred Transitional Care and Rehabilitation Centers bridge the gap between hospital and home. When patients leave a traditional hospital, they often need continued care to recover completely. That’s where we come in.

    While all Kindred centers care for patients with pulmonary diagnoses, some centers offer additional and advanced capabilities to care for these patients. Our pulmonary program is designed to help patients achieve positive outcomes through evidence-based clinical care so that each patient can reach his or her highest level of functioning – all with the combination of critical thinking and clinical excellence that has made Kindred a leader in the field.

     

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  • Kindred Contact Center Nurse Advocates Share Their Most Rewarding MomentsThe Kindred Contact Center serves as a resource for patients and caregivers who have questions about post-acute care, Medicare, insurance, or anything else related to the care of a loved one with needs beyond the traditional hospital. Piloted in Cleveland, it has already received calls from across the country from patients and their caregivers, and was launched nationwide on September 1. Read Full Post
  • Flu Season Is Around the Corner

    By Kindred Healthcare
    While the timing and severity of seasonal flu is unpredictable, being prepared by getting vaccinated and taking everyday precautions can help reduce your risk of being infected.
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  • When Elders Need Care: Odors

    By Sylvia Todor
    Sylvia Todor AuthorOlder adults often have a distinctive smell that may be a perfectly healthy and natural part of aging or that may signal health problems or other challenges they are facing. Sylvia Todor, Regional Marketing Director with Kindred at Home, explains what can cause noticeable body odors as a person ages.

    If you've visited a nursing home, you may have noticed a distinct odor that you associate with older adults. In fact, Johan Lundström, Ph.D., led a study in 2012 in which participants were asked to identify which of two smells came from an older adult. His results indicate that most people were able to identify the smell of an older person versus that of a younger adult. Read Full Post
  • When Elders Need Care: Dehydration Issues

    By Sylvia Todor
    Sylvia Todor AuthorDehydration can lead to problems for people at any age, but for older adults the risks are even greater and the contributing factors are more complex. Sylvia Todor, Regional Marketing Director with Kindred at Home, explains why dehydration is such a serious issue for the elderly.

    One cause of dehydration is physical changes in the body. As we age, our bodies lose water content – young adults may have at least six liters more water in their bodies than someone in their 70s or 80s. Older adults also experience a decreased sense of thirst. Even when their bodies need water, they may not feel thirsty. Kidney function declines, as well, which lessens the body's ability to retain water. Read Full Post