• The 2011 Clinical Impact Symposium Cardio-Pulmonary Rehabilitation Across the Continuum, held December 6-8 in Louisville, Ky., offered some great information on providing patients the highest level of care.

    Cardio-Pulmonary Clinical Impact Symposium “The clinical guidelines for long-term care and rehabilitation have evolved gradually and changed considerably over the last several years,” he says. “Skilled nursing facilities have sometimes lagged behind. Dr. Pandya provided some easy-to-follow instructions and tools that will help those facilities to better manage their patients with diabetes.”

    Sean Muldoon, M.D., Chief Medical Officer and Senior Vice President, Hospital Division, Kindred Healthcare, says that the “hazards of immobility that lead to polymyoneuropathy” theme was a common one during several of the sessions. “This validates the Kindred model of integrated restorative services, which will lead staff to update these findings with renewed determination into hospital care models,” he says.

     

    Daniel Forman, MD, FACC, FAHADaniel Forman, MD, FACC, FAHA

     

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  • With the spotlight on activity professionals during Activities Professionals Week on Jan. 22-28, we asked Emilee Kulin and John Davis of Kindred Nursing and Rehabilitation – Mountain Valley to share the story of their highly successful activities program.

    Del and Elsie Houck celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary on Jan. 16 at Mountain Valley Care and Rehab in Kellogg. Elsie is a resident at our facility. They enjoyed a catered prawn dinner from the Broken Wheel, their favorite restaurant.Del and Elsie Houck celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary on Jan. 16 at Mountain Valley Care and Rehab in Kellogg. Elsie is a resident at our facility. They enjoyed a catered prawn dinner from the Broken Wheel, their favorite restaurant.

    Kulin, the activities director, says that the residents at Kindred Nursing and Rehabilitation – Mountain Valley come from a small rural community of people who worked as miners, loggers, or in recreation fields. “Our residents are used to being active” she says, “so we try to give them activities that will fit that lifestyle. We have Tuesday night poker games, bingo, dominoes and happy hour. On Friday nights, we have a band that plays from 6:30 to 8:30.”

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  • Your Most Important 30 Minutes Today

    By Ryan Squire

    We found this video on YouTube and thought that it did a great job summing up one of the most important themes of the 2011 Clinical Impact Symposium on Cardio-Pulmonary Rehabilitation across the Continuum. We would like you to share what you do in the most important 30 minutes you take for yourself today; you never know, you may inspire another reader with a unique way you stay active. Just add your thoughts in the comments.

    23 1/2 hours, What is the single best thing we can do for our health?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=aUaInS6HIGo#!

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  • Taking Care of Yourself, the Healthcare Provider

    By Ryan Squire

    Kara and Chris started off by comparing the importance of taking care of yourself as a healthcare provider to putting your oxygen mask on first before helping someone.

    "Someday Isle" is the idea that we put off doing things that are better for us until someday, and in the meantime we are comfortable with the idea that someday we will do those things.

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  • Cardiodiabesity

    By Ryan Squire

    CardiodiabesityVisceral adipose tissue or VAT fat was the target of Sharon Himmelstein's opening remarks, and for good reason: VAT fat releases chemicals that enter the liver and lead to diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Himmelstein explained that the amount of VAT is an indicator for diabetes.

    The leading reasons for the spike in VAT in the world population is the change in eating habits over the last few decades. Convenience, advertising, erratic eating, and over eating have lead to VAT levels to shoot up.

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  • Charlotte Smith, MDCharlotte Smith, MD

    Many positive changes in technology and innovation of science have been injected into the experience of health care over the last decade. Dr. Smith cautioned that the good has also brought challenges like less time, less communication, less trust, and more opportunities for things to go wrong.

    In addition, family issues have become a barrier to taking care of the rehabilitation patient. Dr. Smith has experienced that the family has less capacity to be caretakers because of the changes in family structure. Dual income couples, more singles, geographic distance between family members has increased, and definition of family has changed: these factors make it harder for family members to be effective caretakers and create stress.

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  • Cocheco Cardiopulmonary Recovery Program Kindred Transitional Care and Rehabilitation Dover, NH.

    Presented at the 2011 Kindred Healthcare Clinical Impact Symposium by Linda Dubois, RN, AND.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YiSklZTDHyY

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  • Lawrence Cahalin, PhD, PTLawrence Cahalin, PhD, PT

    Activities of physical therapy and rehabilitation are critical in improving outcomes for the patient with heart disease.  The areas to be focused on include aerobic exercise training, resistance/strength training, and inspiration muscle training. These may have important impacts on measures such as hospitalization, quality of life (QOL), and even survival. One of the first steps is understanding your risk for heart attack. Cahalin urged the audience to visit the American Heart Association's website for heart attack risk factor assessment and asked that we have our patients do the same and take the assessment.

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  • Daniel Forman, MD, FACC, FAHADaniel Forman, MD, FACC, FAHA

    Daniel Forman, MD, is Medical Director of the Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Testing Laboratory at Brigham and Women's Hospital. Dr. Forman suggests that while most of focus of heart care is placed on diseases of the heart, there is an enormous opportunity to modify biology and lifestyle years before cardiopulmonary disease ever shows up. Lifestyle factors such as eating habits, exercise habits, tobacco use and sleep add up over time and lead to disease. Add biological factors like age, family history, and genetic predispositions and there are many factors that lead to disease.

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