• Healthcare Headlines -September 2016 in Review

    By Kindred Healthcare

    HCH Monthly

    Hospice Care Improves Patient Experience

    A new study adds to evidence that hospice care during the last six months of life is associated with better overall experiences for patients and a lower likelihood of dying in a hospital. Read More   

    Study Finds Benefits When Seniors Call Shots to Help Them

    A federally funded project that researchers say has potential to promote aging in place began by asking low-income seniors with disabilities how their lives at home could be better, according to a study released Wednesday. Read More  

    Read Full Post
  • Healthcare Headlines - March 2016

    By Kindred Healthcare
    HCH Monthly

    Number of Seniors Who Need Personal Care Help Increasing, CDC Says

    A "significantly" increasing number of adults over age 65 need help with personal care, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Read More 

    Read Full Post
  • Healthcare Headlines Week of January 18, 2016

    By Kindred Healthcare

    HCH 1

    Are Dual-Eligible Demos Succeeding? GAO Says it Will Be Hard to Tell

    The CMS needs to do a better job overseeing the 12 state-administered demonstration programs intended to improve care of people who are eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid, according to the U.S. Government Accountability Office. Read More   

    AHA Issue Brief Looks at Bundled Payment Initiatives

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' Bundled Payment for Care Improvement and Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement initiatives will be important tests of how well Medicare bundled payment efforts can encourage hospitals, physicians, and post-acute care providers to coordinate care to lower spending and improve quality and the patient experience, according to an issue brief released today by the AHA. Read More  

    Read Full Post
  • Heart Attack Recovery: Matt's Story

    By Maggie Cunningham

    Matt Maloney was shoveling snow when he started experiencing chest pains. With a family history of coronary artery disease, his primary care physician sent him in for a stress test. Matt was diagnosed with sudden Myocardial Infarction and was rushed into surgery for emergency coronary bypass grafting. During that procedure, he developed pulmonary edema, an excess of fluid in the lungs.

    Matt had developed acute respiratory distress syndrome, and now required prolonged mechanical ventilation and a tracheostomy. When he left the ICU, he was transferred to Kindred Hospital Heritage Valley where he could be successfully weaned from the ventilator while also monitoring his kidney dialysis.    

    Read Full Post
  • Encouragement to Inspiration: Ashley's Story

    By Maggie Cunningham

    After Ashley came home from her freshman year in college, she made a trip to the doctor. A high cortisol level led to more testing, which led to the discovery of a tumor on her pituitary gland. This was found to be the cause of her high cortisol levels, and she was officially diagnosed with Cushing’s disease. Ashley soon went in for surgery to remove the tumor, which was successful, but with a cost. 

    During the surgery, a blood clot formed that eventually made its way to her lungs. She developed respiratory failure, sepsis, and pneumonia along with ARDS, a severe inflammation of the lungs, according to Sarmad Ashfaq, MD, of Kindred Hospital Heritage Valley, where Ashley was transferred to after surgery for long-term acute care.

    Read Full Post
  • At Kindred Healthcare, we consider ourselves fortunate to call Kansas City, Missouri one of our homes. Our connection to the area runs deep with facilities in the southern area of Kansas City proper, one in the Northland area of Kansas City and several Gentiva home health locations.

    Read Full Post
  • CIS Jane Dailey Nov 12 aJane Dailey is Vice President of Clinical Operations, East Region and Southeast Region, in the Hospital Division of Kindred Healthcare. She provided an update on the Cognitive Care pilot in Dallas, starting first by recognizing what she called “an amazing group of people” in the Dallas-Fort Worth integrated care market. The folks who have been working on the pilot “wanted to continue the impact from the 2013 symposium,” Dailey notes. One year later, she says, “we have identified processes across the continuum that will allow us to promptly screen and evaluate patients with cognitive issues.”

    Read Full Post
  • The Role of Kindred Hospitals in Care Transitions

    By Kindred Healthcare

    Kindred Transitional Care Hospitals Role in Care TransitionsAt Kindred we understand that when people are discharged from a traditional hospital, they often need continued care in order to recover completely. That’s where our Transitional Care Hospitals come in.

    Many medically-complex patients benefit from extended recovery time. Our patients receive that much needed care through treatment delivered according to their individual needs. Our physicians see patients daily to assure the best outcomes possible. Our goal is to help each patient reach the highest level of recovery before being discharged.

    Read Full Post
  • Communicating with Aphasia

    By Kindred Healthcare
    Aphasia1

    Aphasia is a little-known language disorder that affects nearly one-third of stroke victims. It occurs when there is damage to the communications hub in the left side of the brain. While aphasia disrupts communication skills, it does not affect a person’s thinking skills.

    There are many types of aphasia, but the most general categories are receptive and expressive aphasia. With receptive aphasia, the person can hear a voice or read print, but may not understand the meaning of the message. With expressive aphasia, the person knows what he or she wants to say yet has difficulty communicating it to others.

    Someone with receptive aphasia may:

    • Have difficulty comprehending what others say
    • Have difficulty with reading comprehension
    • Be unaware that they are using words incorrectly

    Someone with expressive aphasia may:

    • Be able to understand what others say
    • Have difficulty saying what they are thinking
    • Speak in a jumbled manner
    • Say a word different than the one they want to say
    • Have difficulty writing
     
    Read Full Post
  • Kim Warchol has been an Occupational Therapist specializing in dementia for more than 24 years. One minute of listening to her talk about her field and you can hear the years of experience and passion in every word. But she readily admits that she wasn’t prepared to deal with cognitive impairment when she first started practicing.

    Her “aha!” moment came through the work of Claudia Kay Allen, MA, OTR/L, FAOTA, which completely changed her perspective from focusing on the limitations of patients with cognitive impairment to focusing on uncovering what they could do. She hasn’t looked back since and, she says, she is no longer “leaving these vulnerable individuals to fend for themselves.”

    Read Full Post