• 10 Tips for Healthy Eating on the Run

    By Quincie Grounds, RD/LD, CNSC
    Quincie Grounds, RD/LD, CNSC Quincie Grounds, RD/LD, CNSC

    Americans are looking for fast, easy, and good-tasting foods to fit a busy lifestyle. Whether it’s carry-out, food court, office cafeteria or sit-down restaurant, there are smart choices everywhere. Here are 10 tips to help you eat healthy when eating out. Think ahead and plan where you will eat. Consider what meal options are available. Look for restaurants or carry-out with a wide range of menu items.

    Find more information about healthy eating at www.eatright.org designed to help you "Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right."

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  • Try Something New for National Nutrition Month

    By Quincie Grounds, RD/LD, CNSC

    As we focus on good nutrition during National Nutrition Month, I challenge you to explore new flavors and foods. Explore the vast array of foods at your local grocery store, restaurants, and at home in your own kitchen.

    When shopping, make it a point to try one new fruit, vegetable or whole grain every week. Start small by picking a new variety of apple or potato and then try venturing into the world of whole grains trying whole wheat couscous, quinoa, barley, whole grain rice and whole wheat pastas. Have your family choose a new recipe to try each week that includes an ingredient you aren’t familiar with.

    The next time you and your family head out to eat, choose a restaurant that features ethnic foods from Asia, Europe or Africa. These restaurants often feature menus filled with healthy options that will be new to you. Try a restaurant that specializes in local produce or seasonal ingredients. Try a vegetarian or vegan restaurant. Grab a friend and spend a night enjoying something new.

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  • Celebrate Registered Dietitian Day: March 12, 2014

    By Karen Omietanski, MBA, RD, LD, PMP

    Celebrate Registered Dietitian Dayrecognizes and thanks these food and nutrition experts that provide leadership in the nutrition care of our patients. Over 300 Registered Dietitians provide Medical Nutrition Therapy at Kindred’s Transitional Care and Rehabilitation Centers, Skilled Nursing Centers, Transitional Care Hospitals, Inpatient Rehabilitation Hospitals (IRFs), Kindred at Home, and Regional and Division offices.

    Tina Reilly is the Food and Nutrition Manager and Registered Dietitian (RD) at Kindred Hospital Boston. She states, “I love being a Kindred Hospital dietitian because not only do we care about our patients and fellow employees through food and nutrition, but we are encouraged to use our creative and critical thinking skills to improve patient care services in all areas of the hospital.”

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  • National Nutrition Month: Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right

    By Karen Omietanski, MBA, RD, LD, PMP

     

     Karen Omietanski, MBA, RD, LD, PMP, Senior Director Nutrition, Nursing Center Division Karen Omietanski, MBA, RD, LD, PMP, Senior Director Nutrition, Nursing Center Division

     

    Since 1980, March has been designated as National Nutrition Month®. Take the opportunity this month to focus on what you eat and making the most of your choices. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals, offers these “14 Health Tips for 2014” to help you “Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right”

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  • The Value of a Healthy Workforce

    By Kindred Healthcare

     

     Ronald S. Leopold, MD, MBA, MPH Ronald S. Leopold, MD, MBA, MPH

     

    In the last presentation of the 2013 Kindred Clinical Impact Symposium, Ronald Leopold, MD, MBA, MPH, Senior Vice President, National Practice Leader, Health and Productivity for Wells Fargo Insurance Services, talked about the business value of a healthy workforce.

    People are remaining in the workforce longer than ever before, and perhaps longer than they had planned, Leopold said.

    “Your ability to earn a living is your biggest financial asset,” he said.

    And companies, in turn, are well-served to encourage a healthy workforce.

    “It’s in [companies’] best interest to get their workforces healthier and more importantly, it’s in your own best interest,” Leopold said.

    How can individuals do that? First, they can pick realistic goals and stick with them. Have a healthy lifestyle – move around, eat well, consider behavior changes – what are you doing that you shouldn’t be doing and vice versa?

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  •  Stacey Seggelke, MS, RN, CNS, CDE, BC-ADM Stacey Seggelke, MS, RN, CNS, CDE, BC-ADM

    Stacey Seggelke, sees patients with diabetes both in and out of the hospital, and shared her experiences at the Kindred Clinical Impact Symposium. She is a member of the inpatient Glucose Management team at the University of Colorado Hospital and has an outpatient diabetes clinic one day per week.

    There has been a steady and significant increase in diabetes over the last 30 years. It affects 8 percent of the population, and it is estimated that there are 79 million people who are pre-diabetic. Even when it is not the primary diagnosis, diabetes impacts the care provided to the person, and Seggelke works with her patients from admission to discharge to make sure that the treatments for other medical issues don’t harm the patient or cause problems related to their diabetes.

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  • Pathophysiology of Diabetes Mellitus

    By Kindred Healthcare

    As we learn more about the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus, we find that there is more yet to be discovered. Diabetes mellitus is a syndrome with disordered metabolism and inappropriate hyperglycemia due to either a deficiency of insulin secretion or to a combination of insulin resistance and inadequate insulin secretion to compensate. Type 1 diabetes is due to pancreatic islet B cell destruction predominantly by an autoimmune process, and these persons are prone to ketoacidosis. While type 2 diabetes is the more prevalent form and results from insulin resistance with a defect in compensatory insulin secretion. Diabetes can lead to serious complications, resulting in multiple diseases or disorders that affect multiple systems that may result in premature death.

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  • Diet and Diabetes: What Should I Eat?

    By Karen Omietanski, MBA, RD, LD, PMP

    Nutrition is an important part of managing diabetes. Making good food choices can be challenging – even for people without diabetes! However, if you have diabetes, you need to have a greater awareness about what you eat, how much you eat, and when you eat.

    Foods containing carbohydrates have the greatest impact on blood glucose levels. Does this mean you should avoid “carbs” altogether? Not at all! Carbohydrates are an important part of your diet. They provide energy and essential nutrients. However, to keep blood glucose from getting too high or too low, it is important to eat approximately the same amount of carbohydrates at the same time each day.

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  • Diabetes - Prevalence, Risk, and Prevention

    By Quincie Grounds, RD/LD, CNSC
    Diabetes - Prevalence, Risk, and PreventionDiabetes affects men and women fairly equally, 11.8% to 10.8% respectively. All races are affected, with non-Hispanic blacks having the highest prevalence at 12.6%, closely followed by Hispanics at 11.8%.

    There are many complications with diabetes including heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, blindness, kidney disease, and neuropathy (nervous system disease). Did you know that diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness and kidney disease in adults? People with diabetes have two to four times the risk for heart disease or stroke as an adult without diabetes.

    The financial toll of diabetes is just as shocking.

    After adjusting for population, age and gender differences, average medical expenditures among people with diagnosed diabetes were 2.3 times higher than what expenditures would be in the absence of diabetes.

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  • Transitional Care Programs

    By Kindred Healthcare

    Illinois Family Home Health Services (IFHHS), an affiliate of Kindred at Home, originally developed a Care Transition Program in anticipation of and in response to the October 1, 2012, hospital readmission reimbursement cuts. With the changing landscape of healthcare, IFHHS sought to improve on its better-than-average hospital readmission rates and develop these programs with the needs of hospital discharges in mind.

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