• Healthcare Headlines - July 2016 in Review

    By Kindred Healthcare

    HCH Monthly

    The Night Doctor is in: Why 'Nocturnalists' Are Replacing Some On-Call Physicians

    More hospitals are hiring experienced "nocturnalists" to improve patient safety and prevent calls to tired on-call physicians, according to an article in the Boston Globe. Read More  

    Healthcare Hiring Momentum Leads to another 38,500 Jobs in June

    Healthcare added 38,500 jobs in June and a total of 234,600 jobs in the first six months of 2016, according to initial seasonally adjusted figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Read More  

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  • Healthcare Headlines - June 2016

    By Kindred Healthcare

    HCH Monthly

    Family Caregivers Become More Crucial as Elderly Population Grows

    Strain on family caregivers is alarming many lawmakers and social-service providers. Read More   

    Anti-depressants Carry Much Higher Fall Risk than Anti-psychotics, Study Finds

    Nursing home residents with dementia who take antidepressants are at significantly higher risk of falls and fractures than those on anti-psychotics, new research shows. Read More  

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  • Healthcare Headlines - April 2016

    By Claudia Lab

    HCH Monthly

    AHA Issues Guide for Improving the Patient Experience through the Physical Environment

    One way for hospitals to improve patient satisfaction is to focus on their physical environment, according to a new guide by the AHA's Hospitals in Pursuit of Excellence initiative and American Society for Healthcare Engineering. Read More    

    Hospitals Eye Community Health Workers to Cultivate Patients' Successes

    Donnie Missouri, 58, doesn't have medical training. He started his health career in the linens department in Johns Hopkins Hospital. Read More

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  • Communicating with Aphasia

    By Kindred Healthcare
    Aphasia1

    Aphasia is a little-known language disorder that affects nearly one-third of stroke victims. It occurs when there is damage to the communications hub in the left side of the brain. While aphasia disrupts communication skills, it does not affect a person’s thinking skills.

    There are many types of aphasia, but the most general categories are receptive and expressive aphasia. With receptive aphasia, the person can hear a voice or read print, but may not understand the meaning of the message. With expressive aphasia, the person knows what he or she wants to say yet has difficulty communicating it to others.

    Someone with receptive aphasia may:

    • Have difficulty comprehending what others say
    • Have difficulty with reading comprehension
    • Be unaware that they are using words incorrectly

    Someone with expressive aphasia may:

    • Be able to understand what others say
    • Have difficulty saying what they are thinking
    • Speak in a jumbled manner
    • Say a word different than the one they want to say
    • Have difficulty writing
     
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  • Ventilators of the Past

    By Ryan Squire

     

    The Bird ventilator, named for inventor Forrest Bird, was the first mass-produced mechanical vent, and it used compressed air technology and required no electrical power. Dr. Bird spoke at Kindred’s 2009 Clinical Impact Symposium, and signed the vent that is pictured and on display in the Kindred Support Center lobby.

    Known by some as the “father of mechanical ventilation,” Dr. Bird tested his first mechanical ventilators by piloting his own planes to medical schools and asking doctors for access to their sickest patients. Patients who had tried all the available options and were expected to die of cardiopulmonary disease.

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