• Heart Attack Recovery: Matt's Story

    By Maggie Cunningham

    Matt Maloney was shoveling snow when he started experiencing chest pains. With a family history of coronary artery disease, his primary care physician sent him in for a stress test. Matt was diagnosed with sudden Myocardial Infarction and was rushed into surgery for emergency coronary bypass grafting. During that procedure, he developed pulmonary edema, an excess of fluid in the lungs.

    Matt had developed acute respiratory distress syndrome, and now required prolonged mechanical ventilation and a tracheostomy. When he left the ICU, he was transferred to Kindred Hospital Heritage Valley where he could be successfully weaned from the ventilator while also monitoring his kidney dialysis.    

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  • Encouragement to Inspiration: Ashley's Story

    By Maggie Cunningham

    After Ashley came home from her freshman year in college, she made a trip to the doctor. A high cortisol level led to more testing, which led to the discovery of a tumor on her pituitary gland. This was found to be the cause of her high cortisol levels, and she was officially diagnosed with Cushing’s disease. Ashley soon went in for surgery to remove the tumor, which was successful, but with a cost. 

    During the surgery, a blood clot formed that eventually made its way to her lungs. She developed respiratory failure, sepsis, and pneumonia along with ARDS, a severe inflammation of the lungs, according to Sarmad Ashfaq, MD, of Kindred Hospital Heritage Valley, where Ashley was transferred to after surgery for long-term acute care.

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  • The Role of Kindred Hospitals in Care Transitions

    By Kindred Healthcare

    Kindred Transitional Care Hospitals Role in Care TransitionsAt Kindred we understand that when people are discharged from a traditional hospital, they often need continued care in order to recover completely. That’s where our Transitional Care Hospitals come in.

    Many medically-complex patients benefit from extended recovery time. Our patients receive that much needed care through treatment delivered according to their individual needs. Our physicians see patients daily to assure the best outcomes possible. Our goal is to help each patient reach the highest level of recovery before being discharged.

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  • Kindred: Services for Every Post-Acute Need

    By Kindred Healthcare

    Just as there are different kinds of patients, there are different kinds of hospitals. Kindred Transitional Care Hospitals provide a wide range of services to help patients with complex medical issues who need additional recovery time after a stay at a traditional hospital. While every patient receives individualized care from a team of healthcare professionals, our goal is for each person to reach the highest level of recovery before discharge.

    With our Direct Admit Program, physicians can admit medically complex patients from short-term acute care hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, home health and other service providers directly to a Kindred Hospital. We work directly with physicians to make sure their patients have a smooth transition into our hospitals and the highest level of care continuity to prevent future readmissions.

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  • Bridging the Gap between Short-term Hospitalization and Home

    By Kindred Healthcare

    When Edward came to a Kindred Hospital, he was on a ventilator after respiratory complications following major surgery. Edward is one of many patients who need extra care and more time to recover after a short-term hospital stay. Kindred Hospital is part of a nationwide network of Kindred Transitional Care Hospitals that help bridge the gap between short-term hospitalization and home.

    Bridging the Gap between Short-term Hospitalization and Home

    Many of the patients we see can’t breathe on their own, or they have a condition that makes them prone to more complications with an illness or injury. Kindred Hospitals have been focused on these medically complex patients for more than two decades. We helped develop the long-term model of care for patients who can’t get better during a short-term stay. Our facilities and services are designed to provide this extra level of care, and every patient has a team of healthcare professionals dedicated to achieving the fullest and quickest recovery possible.

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  • Ever wonder what Kindred is doing to take a lead in confronting issues that affect hospitals all over the country, such as alarm fatigue, which happens when too many beeps and buzzes become like background noise to caregivers? The Hospital Division’s Respiratory Care Council is addressing this healthcare challenge as well as others like it. Meeting every other month, the Council’s 21 members – representing each of the regions in which Kindred delivers care, as well as the Support Center in Louisville – strive to identify and share best practices and standardize systems and procedures across the division. They are also working with colleagues from Kindred’s other divisions to achieve enterprise-wide standardization when appropriate.

    Respiratory Care Council Tackles Important Issues, Shares Best Practices

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  • Taking an Innovative Approach to Crucial Patient Education and keeping patients on the road to recovery at the highest level of function possible. As such, Kindred works with chronic-acute patients before they’re discharged to anticipate concerns they might have after they leave and to educate them about medicine management, wound care, follow-up care, caregiver issues and other aspects of their disease process.

    “If patients don’t understand what’s happening to them, they panic and bounce back to the hospital,” says Beth Hock, Chief Clinical Officer, Kindred Hospital Dayton and 2013 President’s Award Winner. “Kindred nurses constantly talk about what they’re doing as another way of training patients about their condition.”

    Kindred Hospital Dayton also recently took patient education to a whole new level with a 48-year-old woman who suffered a spinal injury that left her a ventilator-dependent quadriplegic.

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  • Ventilators of the Past

    By Ryan Squire

     

    The Bird ventilator, named for inventor Forrest Bird, was the first mass-produced mechanical vent, and it used compressed air technology and required no electrical power. Dr. Bird spoke at Kindred’s 2009 Clinical Impact Symposium, and signed the vent that is pictured and on display in the Kindred Support Center lobby.

    Known by some as the “father of mechanical ventilation,” Dr. Bird tested his first mechanical ventilators by piloting his own planes to medical schools and asking doctors for access to their sickest patients. Patients who had tried all the available options and were expected to die of cardiopulmonary disease.

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  • How Well Do You Know These Ventilators?

    By Ryan Squire

    Kindred Healthcare's commitment to our patients is to provide hope, healing and recovery and that means committing to using the latest technologies in pulmonary rehabilitation. Please take a moment to answer the polls and check back next week when we give you the full story on these two important advances in pulmonary rehab. In the meantime, scroll down to the comments and share your experience with these important pieces of history.

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  • An intervention known as noninvasive ventilation is being increasingly studied and used in patients with chronic respiratory failure. An article in a recent issue of the journal Respiratory Care, which followed a national symposium dedicated to the care of the chronically critically ill patient, examined its use in several patient populations. Noninvasive ventilation, or NIV, does not require an artificial airway, in contrast to tracheostomy (surgical creation of an airway through the neck) or the placement of a breathing tube through the nose or mouth. NIV is achieved most often through the delivery of pressure and flow to the normal airway through the nose and/or mouth.

    The benefits of NIV therapy include reduced re-hospitalizations of out-patients and a reduction in potential complications such as infection that can occur with invasive ventilation techniques.

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