• Pure Oxygen, Amazing Results: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for WoundsHyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a process in which a patient breathes 100 percent oxygen at above-normal atmospheric pressure. The process increases the delivery of oxygen to the body, enhancing the body’s natural healing process.

    The Hyperbaric Manager at Kindred Hospital Kansas City has seen the positive effects of HBOT on persistent wounds firsthand.

    "For those who have tried other therapies with no results, they can find great benefits with hyperbaric oxygen wound therapy," she says. It can be "life-changing," she adds, when a patient no longer has to deal with a wound that wouldn't heal and was impacting his daily life. Read Full Post
  • The Bridge From Short-Term Hospitalization

    By Kindred Healthcare
    The Bridge From Short-Term HospitalizationThe most common hospital setting in America is one that provides short-term acute care for patients with pressing health issues – emergencies brought on by an acute illness or an accident. The immediate objective is to stabilize patients and help them recover as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, not all patients can recover quickly. They need a transitional care hospital.

     

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  • The typical stay at a traditional hospital is five days. At Kindred Transitional Care Hospitals, the length of stay may be measured in weeks, not days. Why? Because we know that not all patients can recover in five days or less. Some have underlying conditions that make illnesses or other conditions harder to treat. Others are still too ill to return home.

    At Kindred Hospitals, we offer a range of services to help patients who need additional time to recover, and the length of the stay depends on the needs of the patient. This includes the specialized services of our Subacute Units, where we work with patients who have an acute illness or injury or worsening of a disease but no longer need the aggressive level of care provided in a hospital. We offer short-term comprehensive inpatient medical care and rehabilitation that is designed to get the patient home or to a facility such as a skilled nursing center.

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  • Better Safe Than Scalded

    By Kindred Healthcare

    The first full week in February is Burn Awareness Week. This year, the American Burn Association is focusing on the issue of scalds – a common burn injury – to raise awareness and increase prevention.

    Kathleen Tsalopoulos, East Regional Wound Nurse with Kindred's Nursing Center Division, shared information regarding scald injuries and offered tips on prevention.

    Scald injuries can affect people of all ages, but older adults and those with a disability are particularly vulnerable. Scalding burns are usually a result of spills, splashes, immersion or contact with hot liquids. Older adults have thinner skin, so hot liquids cause deeper wounds even with brief exposure. Additionally, their ability to feel heat may be reduced due to medical conditions or medications.

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  • Bridging the Gap between Short-term Hospitalization and Home

    By Kindred Healthcare

    When Edward came to a Kindred Hospital, he was on a ventilator after respiratory complications following major surgery. Edward is one of many patients who need extra care and more time to recover after a short-term hospital stay. Kindred Hospital is part of a nationwide network of Kindred Transitional Care Hospitals that help bridge the gap between short-term hospitalization and home.

    Bridging the Gap between Short-term Hospitalization and Home

    Many of the patients we see can’t breathe on their own, or they have a condition that makes them prone to more complications with an illness or injury. Kindred Hospitals have been focused on these medically complex patients for more than two decades. We helped develop the long-term model of care for patients who can’t get better during a short-term stay. Our facilities and services are designed to provide this extra level of care, and every patient has a team of healthcare professionals dedicated to achieving the fullest and quickest recovery possible.

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  • What are Pressure Ulcers and Why are They a Problem?

    By Kindred Healthcare

    Have you ever heard the term “bed sore” before? “Bed sore” is another way of saying “pressure ulcer,” a condition that occurs when pressure, with or without friction, builds up in an area of the body, such as the sacrum, coccyx, heels or hips, particularly in an immobile person. Pressure obstructs blood flow to the soft tissue, causing injury to the area. Because pressure ulcers can develop in patients confined to wheelchairs or beds in a hospital or long-term care facility, caregivers must be well trained in preventing pressure ulcers and treating them early and effectively when they do develop. The more advanced a pressure ulcer gets, the harder it is to treat and the longer it may take to heal.

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  •  Stacey Seggelke, MS, RN, CNS, CDE, BC-ADM Stacey Seggelke, MS, RN, CNS, CDE, BC-ADM

    Stacey Seggelke, sees patients with diabetes both in and out of the hospital, and shared her experiences at the Kindred Clinical Impact Symposium. She is a member of the inpatient Glucose Management team at the University of Colorado Hospital and has an outpatient diabetes clinic one day per week.

    There has been a steady and significant increase in diabetes over the last 30 years. It affects 8 percent of the population, and it is estimated that there are 79 million people who are pre-diabetic. Even when it is not the primary diagnosis, diabetes impacts the care provided to the person, and Seggelke works with her patients from admission to discharge to make sure that the treatments for other medical issues don’t harm the patient or cause problems related to their diabetes.

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  • Taking an Innovative Approach to Crucial Patient Education and keeping patients on the road to recovery at the highest level of function possible. As such, Kindred works with chronic-acute patients before they’re discharged to anticipate concerns they might have after they leave and to educate them about medicine management, wound care, follow-up care, caregiver issues and other aspects of their disease process.

    “If patients don’t understand what’s happening to them, they panic and bounce back to the hospital,” says Beth Hock, Chief Clinical Officer, Kindred Hospital Dayton and 2013 President’s Award Winner. “Kindred nurses constantly talk about what they’re doing as another way of training patients about their condition.”

    Kindred Hospital Dayton also recently took patient education to a whole new level with a 48-year-old woman who suffered a spinal injury that left her a ventilator-dependent quadriplegic.

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  • Transitional Care Programs

    By Kindred Healthcare

    Illinois Family Home Health Services (IFHHS), an affiliate of Kindred at Home, originally developed a Care Transition Program in anticipation of and in response to the October 1, 2012, hospital readmission reimbursement cuts. With the changing landscape of healthcare, IFHHS sought to improve on its better-than-average hospital readmission rates and develop these programs with the needs of hospital discharges in mind.

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