10 Helpful Online Resources for Caregivers

By Mike Ogburn tags: Caregivers, Tips

Few people – healthcare professionals aside – plan and prepare to provide care for a loved one. It’s a role you usually come into when your loved one has a medical condition and needs assistance with care or daily activities.

10 Online Resources

If you feel unprepared, you’re not alone. The transition period involves time, effort and on-the-job training. No doubt you will have questions - how do I take care of him, what should she be eating, can I leave him on his own – and initially, you’ll have to seek out the answers.

To make your caregiver journey less bumpy, we’ve outlined 10 online resources that can answer your questions, help you adjust and excel as a caregiver, provide access to useful services, and much more.

AARP

AARP
AARP’s Family Caregiving site provides information, tools and resources to help those caring for a loved one on their journey. Caregiving experts provide information in blogs, webinars and one-on-one interaction through social media channels. The site’s supportive online community can help you connect with others experiencing similar caregiving challenges. Best of all, most of this content is accessible even if you aren’t a member of AARP.

 

Caregiver Action Network

Caregiver Action Network
The Caregiver Action Network (CAN) (formerly the National Family Caregivers Association) offers practical lists for immediate help with caregiving: patient file checklist, doctors’ office checklist, how to find a support group, medication checklist, independent living assessment and helpful videos. This site is easy to navigate, taking you through step-by-step processes to help get a handle on caregiving.

 

Eldercare

Eldercare locater
The Eldercare locater helps you locate local support resources through their free nationwide directory. It is administered through the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging in Washington, D.C.

 

 

Aging Care

Aging Care
This site offers caregiving guides, tips, a forum with a robust question and answer section, and assistance on finding care in your local community.

 

 

Caregiver Support Services

Caregiver Support Services
Some of you might find that caring for a loved one is a second calling. You are a natural, and want to learn more so you take can step up your game even further. Caregiver Support Services supports family and professional caregivers through direct services such as trainings on medication, how to become a personal assistant or a nursing assistant, case management, employee assistance, Alzheimer’s and HIV/AIDS, as well as self-advocacy and other pertinent services. The site includes sections on training, caregiver assessment, and caregiver wellness.

 

Alzheimer’s Association

Alzheimer’s Association
The Alzheimer’s Association provides details on what to expect for each stage of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. You can learn about behaviors specific to Alzheimer’s disease, links to local respite care, legal and financial advice, and local caregiver support groups. There is a great caregiver message board, and a pragmatic stress test. Note: this is just one example of a site designed to help caregivers of loved ones with a very specific ailment. Use Google to find caregiving tips for just about any illness impacting the person you are caring for.

 

Caring Bridge

Caring Bridge
Sometimes the burden of giving care can be lightened by sharing with others. CaringBridge.org connects families and friends around the person with health issues through free, private websites where users share updates and support.

 

 

Caring.com

Caring.com
This website offers a virtual library of caregiver resources and specializes in reviewing professional senior care resources all over the country, such as: assisted living providers, home health, personal care services, etc.

 

VA Caregiver Support

VA Caregiver Support
Run by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the VA Caregiver Support site provides resources, services and other information for family caregivers of veterans.

 

 

National Long-Term Care Clearinghouse

National Long-Term Care Clearinghouse
You may come to the point where your loved one needs a level of care that you are unable to provide. This clearinghouse run by the Administration on Aging answers questions about the nature of long-term care, who needs it, how much it costs (with a state-by state breakdown), how it can be paid for, who provides care within long-term care facilities, and details on Medicare and Medicaid coverage of long-term care. The site explains why everyone needs to plan for long-term care, and takes the user through a step-by-step process of accessing it.

If you have questions about care for yourself or a loved one, call 1.866.KINDRED to speak with a Registered Nurse 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We’re here to listen and can help provide resources that will help you make the right decision for you.