• Know Pain, Know Gain - Clinical Impact Symposium 2016

    By Margaret Schmidt

    The University of Kentucky's College of Health Sciences presented this morning to kick off day two of Kindred's Clinical Impact Symposium. "How do we keep patients progressing at the expected rate, and what gets in the way of that?" asked Art Nitz, PhD, PT, ECS, OCS. How do we keep pain from getting in the way of that?

    Pain, and sometimes our very best efforts, have unintended consequences. We have a shared responsibility to develop approaches that are more efficient, more accessible, more effective and do no harm. He began by discussing how the understanding and articulation of pain also has changed over time.


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  • lorraine and ralph 2 coverPresentation by Scott Strassels, PharmD, PhD. A clinical pharmacist with Optum Hospice Pharmacy Services, a partner of Kindred  

    Medications, while prescribed to promote healing and symptom relief, often have unintended effects that can hinder care goals. All clinicians must be able to recognize medication-related problems and reach out to pharmacists as necessary.

    In Scott's presentation, he sought to help the audience understand the roles of pharmacists in pain and palliative practice and understand how analgesics are chosen based on type and severity of pain.

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  • anna2For infection control nurses, the little things make a difference - from the microscopic germs seeking to wreak havoc to the incremental steps taken to prevent or contain them.

    That's why Anna Lagahit, a nurse and Infection Control Practitioner at Kindred Hospital Santa Ana, goes out of her way to recognize hospital staff for doing the little things to prevent hospital-acquired infections. Staff might receive a "you made a difference today" card from Anna for something as routine as wiping a patient's table or IV machine, keeping catheter lines off the floor or ensuring the cleanliness of everything from the patient to the bed to the area between the bed and bathroom.

    "I am a resource to remind nurses and staff that they are protecting not only the patients but themselves and their families when they go home," she said.


     

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  • Healthcare Headlines -September 2016 in Review

    By Kindred Healthcare

    Hospice Care Improves Patient Experience

    A new study adds to evidence that hospice care during the last six months of life is associated with better overall experiences for patients and a lower likelihood of dying in a hospital. Read More    

    Study Finds Benefits When Seniors Call Shots to Help Them

    A federally funded project that researchers say has potential to promote aging in place began by asking low-income seniors with disabilities how their lives at home could be better, according to a study released Wednesday. Read More   

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  • ds2David and his wife, Linducia, were visiting a friend in Las Vegas. When they returned to their hotel she noticed his breathing didn't seem right. This is his story.

    "It wasn't long after we got back to our hotel that David began having trouble breathing. I called the front desk and the paramedics arrived very quickly" Linducia said. "He was rushed to the hospital and we later found out it was only a matter of minutes before he would have died from a heart attack. He had emergency heart surgery and had three stents put in. During the surgery he also suffered from three strokes and his doctors had to induce a coma."

    After surgery his outlook was very poor. David also began suffering from massive kidney failure and had to have dialysis. "His condition actually worsened" Linducia recalled. "He was on every kind of medication imaginable, completely unconscious and immobile. None of the doctors thought he would survive. Then four weeks into this ordeal I asked his doctors to run an MRI brain scan as he had said that if he was ever brain dead he wouldn't want to 'live' hooked up to a machine."

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  • Healthcare Headlines - August 2016 in Review

    By Kindred Healthcare

    With Room Service and More, Hospitals Borrow From Hotels

    At the Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital outside Detroit, patients arrive to uniformed valets and professional greeters. Read More  

    Remote Heart Monitoring Can Help Detect Emergencies

    Instead of having heart monitors with noisy alarms near patients' beds in the hospital, it might be better to have off-site technicians do the heart monitoring remotely, a recent study suggests. Read More   

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  • Healthcare Headlines - July 2016 in Review

    By Kindred Healthcare

    The Night Doctor is in: Why 'Nocturnalists' Are Replacing Some On-Call Physicians

    More hospitals are hiring experienced "nocturnalists" to improve patient safety and prevent calls to tired on-call physicians, according to an article in the Boston Globe. Read More  

    Healthcare Hiring Momentum Leads to another 38,500 Jobs in June

    Healthcare added 38,500 jobs in June and a total of 234,600 jobs in the first six months of 2016, according to initial seasonally adjusted figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Read More  

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  • Healthcare Headlines - June 2016

    By Kindred Healthcare

    Family Caregivers Become More Crucial as Elderly Population Grows

    Strain on family caregivers is alarming many lawmakers and social-service providers. Read More   

    Antidepressants Carry Much Higher Fall Risk than Anti-psychotics, Study Finds

    Nursing home residents with dementia who take antidepressants are at significantly higher risk of falls and fractures than those on anti-psychotics, new research shows. Read More   

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  • Healthcare Headlines - May 2016

    By Kindred Healthcare

    Nursing Homes Starting to Offer More Individualized Menus

    On a recent Thursday, the staff at Sunny Vista Living Center in Colorado Springs bustled in the kitchen. 

    AHRQ Reports Continued Gains in Health Care Quality

    Health care quality is improving overall, especially in hospitals, and more people have health care coverage and a usual source of medical care since the Affordable Care Act took effect, according to a new report by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Read more.  

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  • The story of Dr. Al Sindi is a remarkable narrative of perseverance, support and recovery. His wife, Dr. Eman, shared it with us on the day before her husband was to be discharged.

    "My husband had spinal surgery in April of 2015. After the procedure, he was highly functional and everything looked like it was going well, until he had an embolic stroke not long afterwards. He lost all function and developed serious complications, including sepsis" said Dr. Eman. "He was admitted to Northwestern Memorial Hospital where he had extensive surgical treatment to stabilize his condition - which couldn't have been more serious as he was completely disabled by the stroke."

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